Seventeen…



(above) Another day to get closer to the finish…Pre-dawn I headed to the Really Big Hardware Store to get the final bits for the propane regulator / switch… Getting things like this done in America is so easy…





(above) Unavailable was the exact hose I wanted, so I configured my own… The blue stuff is Lock-Tite thread goop… It’s what the factory regulator had on the threads…





(above) Where the gas line exits the box, it was siliconed air tight…





(above) Frankenregulator…!!!...


I’ll install it after the space heater in the Jeep warms up the 23 degree outside air temperature to something close to 70 degrees… Probably take an hour…


Meanwhile….…





(above) …...the Porta-Potti pull-out needs a couple of things, both involve epoxy… The face of the pull-out needs a plywood piece added to it (see Post 'Sixteen'), and the inside of the pull out it needs fiberglass cloth reinforcing at the bottom / walls…





(above) You have to look close, but there is a layer of 1.5” fiberglass tape and epoxy on the inside bottom corners… That should strengthen the pull-out bottom to easily handle the weight that it’s designed for…


Next, a thick layer of epoxy was put on both the drawer face and the added-on piece of plywood... Then a few finish nails were used to join them together…





(above) The epoxy joint line was smoothed out with just one of my ten fingers…





(above) I moved the pull-out over to the wall heater in the shop… Accelerated curing is great… More can be done in a day…





(above) The inside of Jeepster was now nice and cozy… Time to get this thing finished…





(above) The box was glued on with caulking gun Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Adhesive… It is not the ultimate in strength, but it is more than strong enough for this application… I like it here because it sets pretty fast and with that, you can get more done in a day… I also put some screws and finish nails to the existing propane locker…





(above) I missed the black wire being on that side of the elbow… I had to “dental floss” it to the other side… Yeah, that close…





(above) Now on the outside of the locker door looking in…


The gauges can be monitored, the fuel tank switch can be reached without moving anything and the hoses coil in over the tanks easily, and are long enough to allow tank connection with the tanks on the ground…


Close to perfect…





(above) Lastly, a new plywood top was added…





(above) Returning to the shop while the adhesives set in the Jeep, I will add plywood spacers onto the bottom of the curb-side cabinet to get the height of the cabinet right for when the finish wood floor goes in… I figured 1/2” should be just right…


Part of the bottom of the cabinet prep is to have the bottom edge of the cabinet at the shower pan fiberglassed because of a small overhang that I don't want to dam in, and that overhang could get wet… You’ll see what I mean near the end of this post…


I use small quantities of epoxy for a lot of these projects and the easiest way to get the resin to hardener 2 to 1 ratio right (critical) is to get a small plastic cup, then with a big syringe pull 20ml of water from a big cup of water, push that 20 ml into the small cup, then mark the meniscus(look it up), go back with the empty syringe to the bigger water cup, pull 10ml of water, push that on top of the 20ml that is already in the small cup and mark that line…


Empty all the water from the small cup then fill to the lines with epoxy then hardener… Mix well, then mix some more… Ready to use…





(above) Bottom of cabinet with plywood fillers and fiberglass cloth and brushed on epoxy…





(above) To accelerate the cure, again I add heat with a heat gun… Constantly moving the gun on high, I go over the epoxy for a couple of minutes… It seems to help the epoxy to set in about half the time it would if no heat was added…





(above) As the epoxy was getting hard, I got this stuff out…





(above) I do not want this insulation on the floor directly under the cabinet since it would not be a rock solid installation with it under there… It is a rubber type thing and it will compress... So I cut it to fit between the spacer ply…





(above) Then it was back to the Jeep… The peel and stick installation is easy…





(above) On top of the cabin / steel body rim, I added ply blocks (glued and screwed) to get the height close to where the back rim of the cabinet will be… I’ll add a final shim or two between the blocks and rim after the cabinet is fastened to the floor…


Getting close to install time, I sanded under the cabinet with 40 grit on the orbital to have a scuffed, clean surface to bond to…





(above) The cabinet is now in the Jeep and on it’s face… I pushed a whole tube of polyuretane adhesive to the riser ply… Again, I wiped all bonding surfaces with a wet rag before pushing the adhesive on…





(above) Flopped over, pushed hard against the wall, pushed hard to the floor, then screwed to the body where I could, screwed to the plywood build ups under the shower area, and machine screwed, washered and nutted to the foam fiberglass floor… Then the glue line at the cabinet and floor was cleaned up…


When done, the cabinet feels like it was welded in place... Goal achieved...





(above) How it looks at the shower… The entire length of this cabinet will be fiberglassed to the floor… Tomorrow…





(above) Put the batteries back in… I put a piece of the insulation under the batteries… Glad that moving the batteries is finished…





(above) And that’s Thursday…


Same time tomorrow…???...