Nineteen…



(above) Guess what we got over the weekend…???…


I better double check that the space heater is plugged in…Check…


Time to get stuff on the ‘To Get’ list…





(above) After an hour or so of mix and matching at Lowes, I have the the components to run the LPG gas from the propane locker to the driver side cabinet where it will supply the stove and heater…I also picked out a few things electrical…





(above) For connecting and allowing easy disconnect of the 120 volt wiring, I’ll use this block…There will be two additional sets of wires tying into the block, thus the jumpers…All soldered as you might expect…


You can also see the T-nuts for screwing the outlet to the wood panel…Wood screws aren’t good enough…





(above) Next it was time to get run the gas line…


I did a lot of research yesterday about what to use for this propane gas line inside the cabin…


Rubber tubing although much easier to install, has greater potential to leak than solid copper…Rubber tubing is meant to be used in well ventilated areas, like outside, connected to a barbeque… Although (some say) that copper is not recommended for natural gas (due to sulfur in the NG) all the sources I researched say it is excellent for LPG…


I used 3/8” soft copper tubing so there will be a continuous pipe run from just outside the propane locker, along the inside of the curb-side cabinet, through the battery compartment, under the floor, into the driver side cabinet, then up to where it will tee for distribution to the stove and heater…


This was seriously hard work…A lot of twists and turns with the pipe in tight areas…And though it’s called soft copper, it was reluctant to go where I wanted it too…The pulling and pushing was in 1/2” hard fought increments…My primary concern while muscling it into place was to not kink the tubing…


The soft copper pipe is initially flexible, but over time gets more rigid…Just what I want...





(above) To feed the tubing up along the cabinet, I needed to open up this panel to gain a way to pull the tubing…





(above) Where the tubing goes through the battery compartment I made sure (x2) that the copper pipe would be absolutely isolated from any contact with the electrical components…First I positioned the tubing in the neutral zone, then covered the copper with that cheesy plastic flex stuff…Later I’ll put foam pipe insulation over the gas pipe everywhere I have access…You just have to do this right…


I also put an 1/8” plywood panel on the sidewall to isolate the tubing and to lock it in place…Additionally it is positioned to further prevent the top battery from a shift backwards…The bottom battery has a plywood stop screwed to the floor…Both batteries are nylon strapped as well…


Through the whole installation of the gas pipe, I was putting the inverter panel in and out, checking and re-checking that the copper tubing and the electrical components have zero chance of movement…





(above) Looking down into the under-floor compartment…


Later I’ll put spray foam insulation at all potential chafing points…





(above) At the propane locker…


The copper connections are all soldered…


The threaded connections are Rector Sealed…


The solenoid will be connected to a propane leak sensor / kill switch…





(above) The whole tubing thing is softly tucked under the plywood rim…Again, I’ll insulate the pipe and strap the whole thing to the body…Safety with gas lines is everything…





(above) Next, I wanted to see if all the electrical work I did worked…Or at least see if I could raise the roof…


With some apprehension (hey, I’m human), I reconnected the vehicle battery… Next, while holding my breath, I turned the switch that turns on the house batteries aand, Nothing … I love the sound of quiet…!!!… Smoke free is nice too…


I started the Jeep (it’s been weeks since it was last run), then turned on the compressor switch to pressurize the air tank that puts air into the pistons that raise the roof…As you can see, it worked… Whew…


But… There is a leak in an air hose fitting, so the roof start to lower after about five minutes…Should be easy to fix…I’ll get new fittings…To keep the roof up until I replace those fittings, I cut two pieces of wood that fit next to the pistons…Good enough for now…





(above) With the roof lifted, I was able to get back into the cab-over…


The first thing I did was swear bad words over and over and over…It was still leaking…!!!…I got the water out, dried it with a towel and worked on getting the light ballasts off the floor…There were tall screws coming out of the lights and I bolted the ballasts to those…I also tied up the wiring …





(above) Better…


(not shown) The last thing I did was put a 3’ wide piece of brown paper on the cab-over floor to see where the leak in coming from…I’ll know tomorrow because it is snowing again tonight and I have a heater inside and it will warm the roof enough to melt and drip…


More later…