(above) It continues…





(above) Yesterday at the end of the day, I rolled out some paper with the expectation of it identifying where the latest leak is coming from…Looks like this one is originating on the wall on the drivers side…





(above) I’m thinking it’s from the wrap-around awning mounting bracket…???…





(above) Driver side fabric overhang…







(above) Up front…The leak is not coming from up here…





(above) Rear corner…It’s not getting in here either…The new gasket is working fine…





(above) The curb side is fine…





(above) Lifting up the curb side front flap…Dry, but hardly sealed…
I’ll get to the leak later…
Next it’s back to the inside…





(above) Spray foam insulation was shot in to keep the wires and pipe from shifting or moving…I put clear packing tape over the hole to keep the foam from expanding up too muck…I’d rather have it spread down and inward…





(above) It was then time to start on the slide-out bed…First I made a pattern of the base length, then I hot-glued on vertical and roof line pieces…
The bed support design will use the cab-over roof as an element in the resistive up loading once the bed is extended and loaded…The roof is sturdy and a great way to help distribute the overall bed load…





(above) I pulled out the mock up to help me remember how the design works…Not so complicated…





(above) The pull-out and drawer guide base is built…1/2” ply for the sides, 1/4” ply for the bottom and back…





(above) I scribed and trimmed the top edge a few times to get the fit just right…





(above) Next was the lamination of the scored foam panel with carbon fiber cloth…An all plywood pull-out would be pretty heavy so the foam / CF panels are built to reduce the weight that will be moved in two directions when the bed is unfolded and set-up to sleep…





(above) I slowly roll out the cloth along a ‘score line’, then tape it along that line…





(above) After that the other edges are carefully aligned then taped…





(above) I need two panels…Notice the nails tacked through the foam to the work table…That is to keep the panel from being anything other than flat…The back plastic is great to work over because cured epoxy does not stick to it…





(above) I measure and mixed the epoxy then used the foam roller to spread the epoxy, always rolling out in one direction…Back and forth leads to wrinkles…After the epoxy is saturated, the squeege (made from a cut vertical window blind) the carbon cloth is pushed down onto the foam…Just using a roller will not get the foam down hard and flat to the foam…





(above) Two panels laminated up front and the bed base is coated with epoxy in the back…Everything is designed to be leaked upon…I hope not, but build for it…
More bed work tomorrow if the power is still on…The weather forecast is calling for record snow overnight…I hope they are wrong…